Welcome to the Warburton Website

Welcome to the Warburton Website, which includes my Warburton One-Name Study, and Warburton DNA Project. To learn more about this site please visit the various sub-page under the About menu item.

I hope you will find this site useful in your own studies of Warburton family history. You are invited to subscribe to receive notifications of future Posts about my research, future site updates, or anything else of interest.

The site also includes a Forum where anyone can initiate or participate in conversations with other interested parties on any subject related to  Warburton family history. Anyone can view the Forum but you will need to register to participate.

The Warburton DNA Project enhances the knowledge gained from traditional genealogical research. For example about half of all Warburtons belong to one of two groups, one descended from a Norman knight, the other from a Saxon inhabitant of the village of Warburton. Several smaller groups have also been identified. My DNA Project has devised a low cost strategy to determine if you belong to one of these groups, so please contact me (click my picture to the right) if you are interested.

I also welcome questions, comments, and anything you have which may enhance the site.

Ray Warburton

New Cheshire Group Haplotree

I have produced a new version of the haplotree that is in The Cheshire Group document on the DNA Project Page. It is a new document as it is getting too big to include in the original. That in The Cheshire Group is unchanged for now but will be removed on the next rewrite. In producing it I also did a new Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor (TMRCA) calculation for 3 Warburtons and 2 Duttons that have 111 marker STR results. This is also linked to from the DNA Project Page.

My objective in producing the haplotree is to provide a basis for forthcoming work on Cheshire Group SNPs.  We have 2 BigY results (including mine) which have produced 14 new SNPs that occurred after the Warburton-Dutton split. I have now had tests created at YSEQ for these SNPs, though there are 4 they don’t recommend for various reasons.
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So getting back to the 6 unique SNPs from the Percy Grey family I am keen to test these on representatives of the other four Partington clans. It doesn’t have to be the the person who tested originally. If you are up for it please let me know.

New Year Plans

Firstly I wish everybody a Happy New Year and lots of success in your research. It seems an auspicious moment to reflect on Work in Progress and plan for 2018. I seem to have a number of interrupted projects and…

Y11 Upgrade Offer

Those of you who have done an STR test at FTDNA will have received a very good offer to upgrade to Y111, even if you have already done BigY. This seems to run counter to my new strategy, but in fact I think it is just another step beyond it, designed to give greater granularity in the most recent period. SNPs only occur every 130 years on average, so it may be necessary to differentiate people who match closely on SNPs.

However the situation is confusing. Somebody has just asked the following  on the U106 forum:

I have received an offer from FtDNA to upgrade my father’s kit to Y-111 and I was wondering if it is worth doing?

Cheapest BigY Yet

This Christmas the bonus offers from FTDNA seem to get better with time. I wish I had waited a bit longer to order the new Lancashire Group BigY. Now, curtesy of Ian Warburton, I have a $100 coupon off any purchase of $450 or more. That means a BigY test, normally $575, sale price $475, can now be bought for $375.

BigY can only be bought as an upgrade to a previous STR test, so to be eligible you need to have done one of the Y12, Y37, Y67, or Y111 tests.

As I am heading to France for Christmas tomorrow I will declare the offer and coupon code here:

Offer: $100 Off any purchase of $450 or more. Use promo code R33T6AQ5CQMD at checkout.

The first one to use it will get it. It is valid until close of business next Sunday, Christmas Eve. If you miss it but are still keen let me know and I will try and find another one.

In my recent post, and draft Journal of One-Name Studies article, I outlined the benefits of SNP testing and declared BigY as the test of choice for those who can afford it. We have made a lot of progress in understanding the history of the Lancashire and Cheshire Groups, but none of the other smaller Warburton groups, or individual, unmatched results have progressed to SNP testing to understand the history of their Y-chromosome, or to find close matches with any other name. Remember with STR results,  most matches with non-Warburtons will be spurious. They are only really useful for same name matches. With a shared, recent SNP you know you have a match.

I also recommended a cheaper alternative STR test for those looking to use it as a low cost entry point, and I now have one such test ordered by a prospective new member of the Lancashire Group.

Alan Warburton- Artist

Back in September (2017) I received a letter from Alan Warburton, an artist who lives in the Rhondda. It included pictures of a number of murals he has produced around South Wales over the years, together with  newspaper cuttings about them. Unfortunately for various reasons the murals no longer exist, so the photos represent the sole surviving record.

At the time I was busy with my Warburton day which resulted in various stories I have since published, and other work. I have only just got around to deciding how to handle Alan’s package.

I have set up a page called Alan Warburton Artist under Gallery to show his output. Below are a couple of examples.

The Miners Murinal on the Aberrhondda Road was the second of three murinals painted by Alan in Porth, Rhondda Valley 1976-7. It had the distinction of being opened by Prince Charles on July 28th 1976.

In 1982 Alan won an Operation Facelift competition sponsored by Cardiff City Council and the South Wales Echo. His idea to improve a British Rail water tower was to paint giant daffodils on it. In 1984 his idea was put into practice. Alas the water tower still exists but the daffodils are long gone.